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April 3, 2017

  

Monday, April 03, 2017

Event Image Fall 2017 Petitions Accepted for Colorado Residency (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

See Tuition Classification.
Event Image Fall 2017 Registration for Current Degree-Seeking Graduate Students (By Assigned Appointment) (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

View enrollment dates in MyCUInfo. Registration remains open through Aug. 24.
Event Image Fall 2017 Registration for Current Degree-Seeking Undergraduates (By Assigned Appointment) (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

View enrollment dates in MyCUInfo. Registration remains open through June 16. The schedule adjustment period is Aug. 14–18.
Event Image Summer 2017 Petitions Accepted for Colorado Residency (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

See Tuition Classification.
Arabic 3120
9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

ARAB 3120
ARAB-1020 001 Beginning Arabic 2
10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).

Instructor: Randa Muhammed.
CMCI Informational Meeting
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

The College of Media, Communication and Information (CMCI) offers students the cutting-edge skills and intellectual insight to thrive in today’s media landscape. We welcome you to become part of this great community of students and faculty who share your passion for the new world of digital communication.

CMCI offers six undergraduate degrees: Strategic Communication (The Department of Advertising, Public Relations and Media Design); Communication; Media Production (The Department of Critical Media Practices); Information Science; Journalism; and Media Studies.

Current CU Boulder undergraduate students who want to pursue one of the six undergraduate degrees in CMCI must apply to the college.

For more information and to speak to an advisor, come to an informational meeting. More info »

ARAB-1020 002 Beginning Arabic 2
11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).
Instructor: Randa Muhammed.

Managing Disruptive Behaviors and Assisting Students in Crisis In and Out of the Classroom
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

This is typically a tough time of year for students and we want to make sure that students who are struggling or at-risk, receive intervention and assistance. Student Support and Case Management (SSCM) will assist students and refer more challenging or concerning situations to the Students of Concern Team.  SSCM focuses on early intervention. Our abilities to provide intervention and support to students showing signs of distress or concerning behaviors depends on you referring students to us. Faculty and staff who have utilized our services have expressed a great sense of relief and appreciation for our assistance. An additional benefit is that students who work with case managers have higher graduation rates.

Space is limited. Please register to attend. Beverages and desserts will be available.

ARAB-1020 003 Beginning Arabic 2
12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).
Instructor: Randa Muhammed.

 
Brown Bag
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Speaker: Juhi Huda
Title: "Connecting Narrative Variables to Policy Outcomes: An Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in the Agricultural Biotechnology Policy Debate in India"
SEEC S216
Swedish 2020 - Merete Leonhardt Lupa
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Swedish 2020 - Merete Leonhardt Lupa
Event Image Lecture: Black Gospel in the Netherlands
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Portia Maultsby, professor at Indiana University, presents a paper as part of the Musicology and Music Theory Colloquium Series.

College of Music   Map to Venue
Swedish 1020
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Swedish 1020 - Merete Leonhardt-Lupa
TIGER 1 Workshops: Teaching Critical or Scientific Thinking in the Age of Social Media and Fake News
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Teaching Critical or Scientific Thinking in the Age of Social Media and Fake News (Rescheduled from Feb. 6) - ATLAS 301 4:00-5:00pm
Doug Duncan, Director, Fiske Planetarium

For over a decade I have taught a “supplementary” curriculum designed to be used in any science class for non-science majors. The goal is to get students to be able to distinguish good science from fake, bogus, or pseudoscience designed to fool them. The tremendous recent increase in “Fake News” makes teaching these skills even more critical.  I’ll describe what I do. I’ve put this curriculum online; anyone is welcome to use it. I have published one paper on this approach, co-authored with Dr. Leilani Arthurs of the Univ. of Nebraska.
Event Image Dr. Emily Baragwanath, UNC-Chapel Hill - "Watching the Girls Go By...
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Watching the Girls Go By: The Wife of Ischomachus and Theodote the Courtesan

presented by Dr. Emily Baragwanath, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Monday, April 3, at 4:30 PM in HUMN 250

 

Across his eclectic literary oeuvre Xenophon displays a remarkable interest in women and their role and value in society. Shining a spotlight on the portraits in his Socratic works of two women of Ath­ens -  the courtesan Theodote, a key figure in modern constructions of Athenian prostitution, and her opposite number, the unnamed citizen wife of an Athenian gentleman - the paper examines the literary strategies through which Xenophon provocatively tested readers' assumptions about female agency and experience.  It also looks afresh at the nature of Xenophontic irony, created by showcas­ing the ideal household against the backdrop of its future scandal and ruin, and in the startling sustained comparison drawn between Theodote and Socrates himself.

 This event is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome.

Sponsored by Graduate Committee on the Arts Humanities, Center for Western Civilization, Thought and Policy, and the Departments of Classics, History, Philosophy, and Women and Gender Studies. 

 

Lecture: Watching the Girls Go By: The Wife of Ischomachus and Theodote the Courtesan
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Across his eclectic literary oeuvre, Xenophon displays a remarkable interest in women and their role and value in society. Shining a spotlight on the portraits in his Socratic works of two women of Athens—the courtesan Theodote, a key figure in modern constructions of Athenian prostitution, and her opposite number, the unnamed citizen wife of an Athenian gentleman—the paper examines the literary strategies through which Xenophon provocatively tested readers’ assumptions about female agency and experience. It also looks afresh at the nature of Xenophontic irony, created by showcasing the ideal household against the backdrop of its future scandal and ruin and in the startling sustained comparison drawn between Theodote and Socrates himself.

This event is free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome. Sponsored by GCAH, CWCTP, and the Departments of Classics, History, Philosophy, and Women and Gender Studies.
'Watching the Girls Go By' Talk by Baragwanth
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

"Watching the Girls Go By: The Wife of Ischomachus and Theodote the Courtesan" presented by Emily Baragwanth, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Across his eclectic literary oeuvre, Xenophon displays a remarkable interest in women and their role and value in society. Shining a spotlight on the portraits in his Socratic works of two women of Ath­ens—the courtesan Theodote, a key figure in modern constructions of Athenian prostitution, and her opposite number, the unnamed citizen wife of an Athenian gentleman—the paper examines the literary strategies through which Xenophon provocatively tested readers' assumptions about female agency and experience. It also looks afresh at the nature of Xenophontic irony, created by showcas­ing the ideal household against the backdrop of its future scandal and ruin and in the startling sustained comparison drawn between Theodote and Socrates himself.

Sponsored by Graduate Committee on the Arts Humanities, Center for Western Civilization, Thought and Policy and the Departments of Classics, History, Philosophy, and Women and Gender Studies.
ALTEC Community Courses non-credit languages
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Various language courses
Event Image CU and City of Boulder Open House
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

The City of Boulder, Boulder County and University of Colorado Boulder will host an open house for community members interested in the draft Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan, the city’s Inclusionary Housing Program, the CU South property, and 3303 Broadway analysis. Boulder Valley residents, property owners and employees are invited to share feedback on several of these ongoing planning projects.

The open house is informal and residents may drop in any time from 6 to 8:30 p.m. A brief presentation about the CU South project will take place at 7 p.m. Free parking is available in parking lots north of the building.

Event Image The Nobel Lecture Series, Spring 2017
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Join CU Boulder faculty (including the English department's Adam Bradley on January 30th, at 7:00 p.m.) for a series of lectures on Nobel Prize-winning authors from around the world! The lecture series is free and open to the public.

January Lecture: Monday, January 30th at 7:00 p.m.
Bob Dylan, awarded the most recent Nobel Prize in Literature in 2016
Bob Dylan is an American songwriter, singer, artist, and writer noted for creating new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.
Presented by Associate Professor Adam Bradley (Dept. of English)

February Lecture: Monday, February 27th at 7:00 p.m.
Dario Fo, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1997
Dario Fo was an Italian playwright and actor who emulated the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden. Presented by Professor Valerio Ferme (Dept. of French & Italian, Associate Dean for the Arts and Humanities)

March Lecture: Monday, March 20th at 7:00 p.m.
Herta Müller, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2009
Herta Muller is a Romanian-born German novelist, poet, and essayist who, with the concentration of poetry and the frankness of prose, depicts the landscape of the dispossessed. Presented by Associate Professor Beverly Weber (Dept. of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures)

April Lecture: Monday, April 3rd at 7:00 p.m.
Joseph Brodsky, awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1987
Joseph Brodsky was a Russian and American poet and essayist noted for an all-embracing authorship, imbued with clarity of thought and poetic intensity. Presented by Professor Mark Lipovetsky (Dept. of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures)

Event Image Doctoral Student Recital: Gregory Harris, vibraphone
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

College of Music   Map to Venue
Event Image Dual Junior Student Recital: Constantine Tsanos, percussion, and Kyle Richardson, percussion
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

PROGRAM: Jacques Delecluse: Etude No. 1 and Etude No. 3; Charles Wilcoxon: "Swinging the '26'"; Frédéric Chopin: Three Preludes; Kyle Richardson & Constantine Tsanos: "Flavors"; Miles Davis: "Nardis"; Joseph Kosma: "Les Feuilles Mortes"; Kenny Dorham: "Blue Bossa"; Dave Brubeck, Paul Desmond and Tito Puente: "Take Five (mambo)"

College of Music   Map to Venue
Event Image Master Student Recital: George Ryan, piano
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

PROGRAM: Francis Poulenc: Sonata for Flute and Piano; Darius Milhaud: Suite for Violin, Clarinet and Piano; Aram Khachaturian: Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano; George Crumb: "Eleven Echoes of Autumn"

College of Music   Map to Venue


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