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February 23, 2017

  

Thursday, February 23, 2017

ARAB 1020 001 (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

ARAB 1020 001 - Muhammed
Event Image Fall 2017 Curriculum Management Schedule 25 Room Process Runs (Multi-Day Event)
All Day

Feb. 6–24, 2017

The Schedule 25 process assigns centrally controlled classrooms to classes and assigns classrooms for all lecture and seminar classes, labs and rec classes.

NOTE: During this period, no changes to Fall 2017 can be made in Campus Solutions.
Inclusive Rec: Goalball Drop In (Multi-Day Event)
End Time 9:00 PM

Come learn what Goalball is all about.  Bring your friends and stop by to give Goalball a try in an informal, drop-in setting. Although designed for the vision impaired, Goalball is fun for everyone. Players rely on the sound of the bell within the ball to judge its position and movements, while trying to get the ball in the opponent's goal. Come to the lower basketball courts and try it for yourself! 

Like all Inclusive Rec events, this event is completely free. 
Event Image CUnity day


On CUnity Day, held March 2nd, we will all wear #BeBoulderTogether t-shirts to remind our peers affected by the recent immigration execute order that they belong to our engineering community and fill our halls with positive encouragement. Information and ways for students to help support our international students will be available. Lastly, at 3:00 pm, we will end the day with coffee and cookies.
Creation, validation, and department approval due for Feb
All Day

for cost transfers, JEs and PETs for Fund 30/31 projects, Fund 34 gift funds, and all Cash Transfers by 6:00 p.m.
Event Image Universal Design for Learning with iOS Devices; Luis Perez, Apple Distinguished Educator
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

This session will discuss the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) philosophy in relation to the capabilities of iOS devices. In particular, the iPad is a powerful example of a device that incorporates the key tenets of the UDL philosophy, with a variety of built-in accessibility features available to users out of the box as standard options. While many of these features (such as text to speech and speech recognition) were originally designed for people with disabilities, today they can help all learners enjoy equitable access to information, communication and expression. Along with the many apps that can be installed, these accessibility features make the iPad a powerful tool for customizing the learning experience to meet the variable needs of a diverse student population. Other factors such as the portability of the device and its social acceptability have also made the iPad a popular choice for meeting the needs of diverse learners. However, to get the most out of the iPad and its many supported apps, we as educators must move beyond its use as an enhancement of traditional practices and instead explore the unique affordances that make it an ideal tool for redefining and transforming the learning environment. You will leave this session with a toolkit for access and inclusion that will assist you in providing a more flexible learning environment where every one of your learners can succeed.

Register or learn more about this and all the other events highlighting diversity and inclusion in the classroom at this year’s Diverse Learners Awareness Week. Registration is encouraged, but not required.
Event Image Allyship Fundamentals: A Perspective from the Graduate Student Leadership
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

This discussion focuses on basic approaches to overcome the hurdles of social allyship. This session is useful to people interested in becoming an ally of an underrepresented group to which they don’t belong. The purpose of the session is to offer some answers and useful examples of strategic and day-to-day allyship. Presented by Juan Garcia Oyervides; Vice President of Student Affairs at United Government of Graduate Students; Ginnie Logan, Graduate Co-Senator; Oliver Stagliano, Peer Educator at the Gender and Sexuality Center
Graduate Seminar: Kakani Katija
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Kakani Katija - Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
"How small-scale animal-fluid interactions have large-scale implication"

Thursday, February 23, 2017
9:30am-10:30am (refreshments at 9:15am)
Fleming Building, Room 156
Event Image Universal Design for Learning with iOS Devices with Luis Perez, Apple
9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

This session will discuss the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) philosophy in relation to the capabilities of iOS devices. In particular, the iPad is a powerful example of a device that incorporates the key tenets of the UDL philosophy, with a variety of built-in accessibility features available to users out of the box as standard options. While many of these features (such as text to speech and speech recognition) were originally designed for people with disabilities, today they can help all learners enjoy equitable access to information, communication and expression. Along with the many apps that can be installed, these accessibility features make the iPad a powerful tool for customizing the learning experience to meet the variable needs of a diverse student population. Other factors such as the portability of the device and its social acceptability have also made the iPad a popular choice for meeting the needs of diverse learners. However, to get the most out of the iPad and its many supported apps, we as educators must move beyond its use as an enhancement of traditional practices and instead explore the unique affordances that make it an ideal tool for redefining and transforming the learning environment. You will leave this session with a toolkit for access and inclusion that will assist you in providing a more flexible learning environment where every one of your learners can succeed.
ARAB-1020 001 Beginning Arabic 2
10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).

Instructor: Randa Muhammed.
TIGER 2 Workshops: Life After the Degree: Musings from Boulder Professionals
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Life After the Degree: Musings from Boulder Professionals

Preston Cumming, Lead Coordinator, Graduate Teacher Program

So, you came to Boulder and everybody said "if you want to stay in Boulder, don't get your degree here." Well, that's not necessarily true. This panel discussion will have several locals who made it work and have been quite successful in doing so. Come hear professionals from Business, Government, Industry and the Arts talk about their own paths.

ARAB-1020 002 Beginning Arabic 2
11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).
Instructor: Randa Muhammed.

Event Image CCW Caucus
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Join the Chancellor's Committee for Women (CCW) for lunch to give us feedback on women's issues on the CU Boulder campus. We will provide lunch; you provide your voice. We look forward to meeting you and hearing your thoughts at our monthly Listening Lunches. RSVP to ccwomen@colorado.edu.

* CCW considers women’s issues to include all issues pertaining to women of color, transgender women, genderqueer people, and all other women. These lunch dialogues are open for students, staff, and faculty who are women-identified.

Event Image Don't Ignore It - Bystander Skill for Ally Development
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

This session will introduce the bystander intervention framework as a platform for ally development. This approach opens up participants' ability to see more possible entry points into situations where allies can help. This includes generating a repertoire of strategies for intervening that fit for both the person offering help and the situation they are confronting. We also develop and practice communication skills for being effective as an ally. This includes fostering resiliency in the face of rejection and building stamina for staying engaged with the situation.
Event Image Post-election dialogues: Moving forward with diversity & inclusion
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Join a facilitated dialogue exploring the diverse range of perspectives, hopes, and fears held by members of the CU community in our post-election climate. Dialogue participants will be invited to share their experiences with issues around diversity and inclusion on campus since the election and how these experiences can shape CU’s ongoing efforts towards inclusive excellence.

Developed by BoulderTalks, CU Dialogues, and the Intergroup Relations Working Group, these dialogues provide a chance to continue to co-construct what inclusion and diversity mean here at CU, especially in our current post-election climate.
 
The dialogues are scheduled for the following times in the Glenn Miller Ballroom in the UMC:
 
- Feb. 23, 11:00 - 12:15
- Feb. 23, 12:30 - 1:45
- Feb. 23, 2:00 - 3:15
- Feb. 23, 3:30 - 4:45

These dialogues are part of CU Boulder’s Diversity and Inclusion Summit.

 
Leah Sprain, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor | University of Colorado Boulder
ARAB-1020 003 Beginning Arabic 2
12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Continuation of ARAB 1010. Requisites: Requires prerequisite course of ARAB 1010 (minimum grade C).
Instructor: Randa Muhammed.

 
Event Image Outreach and Engagement with Diverse Communities
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM

A panel of outreach and engagement experts will share their experience in preparing meaningful programs for diverse communities as part of the spring 2017 Diversity & Inclusion Summit on campus. The panelists include: Satya Chavez, teaching artist with the Colorado Shakespeare Festival; Beth Osnes, associate professor with the Department of Theatre & Dance; Nicole Speer, director of operations with the Intermountain Neuroimaging Consortium; and Hannah Wilks, director of the Volunteer Resource Center. Roudy Hildreth, associate faculty director with CU Engage, will moderate the session. The session is hosted by the CU Boulder Outreach and Engagement Professionals Network (OEPN).
Webinar: The Secrets to Finding Work You Love
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

When: ​Thursday, February 23rd, 2017
​​Where: ​Webinar
​Who: ​Leeds Alumni and Friends

RSVP
Event Image Identifying and Addressing Microaggressions with Professors Jim Walker and Valentina Iturbe-LaGrave
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

This interactive session offers a research-informed, hands-on approach to enacting inclusive pedagogy in post-secondary learning environments. By recognizing the intercentricity of race and racism as they relate to university structures, practices, and discourses that inadvertently lead to hostile learning environments, Dr. LaGrave and Dr. Walker collaborate in an interdisciplinary approach to thinking and working through difference. The session draws from recent actual CU classroom scenarios to offer models for responding to latent/blatant racism, homophobia, sexism, gender norming/shaming, white denial/fragility, and more.

Guided by findings from recent research and classroom observations, participants will gain hands-on experience identifying and responding to a variety of comments and incidents involving implicit-bias, prejudice, or stereotyping. Through small-group interaction, attendees will develop and practice strategies for turning such "flashpoint" moments into encounters which can foster safe, inclusive, and collegial learning environments.

Event Image Post-election dialogues: Moving forward with diversity & inclusion
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Join a facilitated dialogue exploring the diverse range of perspectives, hopes, and fears held by members of the CU community in our post-election climate. Dialogue participants will be invited to share their experiences with issues around diversity and inclusion on campus since the election and how these experiences can shape CU’s ongoing efforts towards inclusive excellence.

Developed by BoulderTalks, CU Dialogues, and the Intergroup Relations Working Group, these dialogues provide a chance to continue to co-construct what inclusion and diversity mean here at CU, especially in our current post-election climate.
 
The dialogues are scheduled for the following times in the Glenn Miller Ballroom in the UMC:
 
- Feb. 23, 11:00 - 12:15
- Feb. 23, 12:30 - 1:45
- Feb. 23, 2:00 - 3:15
- Feb. 23, 3:30 - 4:45

These dialogues are part of CU Boulder’s Diversity and Inclusion Summit.

 
Leah Sprain, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor | University of Colorado Boulder
APPM Complex/Dynamical Systems Seminar - Aaron Hagerstrom
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Aaron Hagerstrom, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO

Cluster synchronization and symmetries in networks of coupled dynamical systems

Synchronization is an important and prevalent phenomenon in natural and engineered systems. In addition to the widely-studied case of global synchronization, many networks also exhibit cluster synchronization: a state where there are two or more synchronized subsets of nodes which are not synchronized to each other. Over the past few years, several works have demonstrated the utility of computational group theory for predicting patterns of cluster synchronization in networks based on the topology of the network, and analyzing the stability of these patterns against perturbations. Since dynamical states which are unstable do not persist in the presence of noise, this stability analysis can be used to determine under what conditions a particular cluster synchronization pattern is physically realizable. In networks with Laplacian coupling, where the coupling between nodes is balanced to insure that global synchronization is possible, there are more possible patterns that may be observed, but these can be predicted and analyzed within the same framework. Recent work has also demonstrated that these techniques can be used to predict the existence of chimera states in small, globally-coupled networks. These theoretical results are supported by experiments with chaotic optoelectronic feedback loops.
German Kaffeestunde (Coffee Hour)
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

German conversation hour kit Kaffee und Kuchen
Event Image Overview of Measuring Intercultural Competence with Amy Moreno
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Join CU Boulder Qualified Administrators for an overview of the group and individual intercultural development inventory (IDI) process. Intercultural competence is the ability to shift perspective and behavior across cultural similarities and differences. Engaging in the IDI process will allow your department and individuals a better understanding of their strengths and challenges that influence their contributions to an inclusive campus environment. In other words, the IDI provides in-depth insights on how individuals and groups make sense of cultural differences and also how they respond to cultural differences. The IDI measures both one’s mindset and skill-set.
Event Image Post-election dialogues: Moving forward with diversity & inclusion
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Join a facilitated dialogue exploring the diverse range of perspectives, hopes, and fears held by members of the CU community in our post-election climate. Dialogue participants will be invited to share their experiences with issues around diversity and inclusion on campus since the election and how these experiences can shape CU’s ongoing efforts towards inclusive excellence.

Developed by BoulderTalks, CU Dialogues, and the Intergroup Relations Working Group, these dialogues provide a chance to continue to co-construct what inclusion and diversity mean here at CU, especially in our current post-election climate.
 
The dialogues are scheduled for the following times in the Glenn Miller Ballroom in the UMC:
 
- Feb. 23, 11:00 - 12:15
- Feb. 23, 12:30 - 1:45
- Feb. 23, 2:00 - 3:15
- Feb. 23, 3:30 - 4:45

These dialogues are part of CU Boulder’s Diversity and Inclusion Summit.

 
Leah Sprain, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor | University of Colorado Boulder
Religion, Pedagogy, and the Multicultural Classroom with Sabahat Adil and Aun Husan Ali
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

This panel will discuss topics related to religion, pedagogy, and the American multicultural classroom. Two overarching questions that we will engage with in the facilitated discussion include the following: 

  • How do our diverse students engage with topics with which they have preconceived notions, particularly in a world where ideas on religions and their practitioners such as Islam and Muslims are widespread, and how do we as professors engage with such topics in the college classroom in ways that enrich our students' lives?
  • How do we engage with topics in the classroom, overtly sensitive ones or otherwise, in light of our own personal or perceived identities?
Swedish 1020
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Swedish 1020 - Merete Leonhardt-Lupa
Event Image Understanding the 'Deep Story' of the American Right: Bridging the Empathy Wall
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Arlie Russell Hochschild spent five years immersed among Tea Party loyalists—now mostly supporters of Donald Trump— to try to explore the “deep story” underlying the right that remains unrecognized by the left. This facilitated discussion will provide a brief overview of Hochschild’s research and explore how shifting cultural perspective and striving to develop tolerance for intensely different ways of thinking may help us bridge the “empathy wall” that divides the political landscape of the United States. The presenters encourage attendees to review Hochshild’s article I Spent 5 Years with Some of Trump’s Biggest Fans. Here’s What They Won’t Tell You prior to attending this session.
Event Image Unpacking Heteronormativity with Scarlet Bowen and Morgan Seamont
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

This session will highlight the ways that heteronormative assumptions influence and hinder our work at the university. From how we report on the rates of sexual assault, to how we think about bathroom accessibility, to how we address students, heteronormativity operates as a powerful deterrent to inclusive practices. Join us in a discussion of how to notice and challenge heteronormative structures and practices at the university.
Event Image Chemical & Biological Engineering Seminar: Jamie Spangler
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Hear from Jamie Spangler, postdoctoral scholar in the Departments of Molecular & Cellular Physiology and Structural Biology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Spangler will present a talk titled, "Reshaping the immune response through molecular engineering."

The event is part of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering seminar series and is hosted by Anushree Chatterjee.
CompSci Colloquium: Bradley Hayes (MIT)
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Learning to be a Good Teammate: Algorithms for Efficient Human-Robot Collaboration

ABSTRACT: Robots capable of fluent collaboration with humans will bring transformative changes to the way we live and work. In domains ranging from healthcare to education to manufacturing, particularly under conditions where modern automation is ineffective or inapplicable, human-robot teaming can be leveraged to increase efficiency, capability and safety. Despite this, the deployment of collaborative robots into human-dominated environments remains largely infeasible due to the myriad challenges involved in creating helpful, safe, autonomous teammates.

In this talk, Hayes will present his recent work in overcoming these challenges, toward realizing flexible, communicative robot collaborators that both learn and dynamically assist in the completion of complex tasks through the application of novel learning and control algorithms. In particular, he will cover approaches to hierarchical task modeling, task and motion planning, and cooperative inverse reinforcement learning within the theme of human-robot teaming, focusing on the interpretable learning, synthesis and execution of supportive behaviors. He will conclude with insights gained from real-world deployments of such systems and a perspective on future directions for human-robot teaming research.

BIO: Bradley Hayes is a postdoctoral associate in the Interactive Robotics Group within the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Hayes's research interests center around developing the algorithms necessary for building supportive, interactive and intuitive robotic systems that are capable of performing complex collaborative tasks in environments shared with humans. His work combines theoretical advances and practical applications of machine learning, task and motion planning, human teaming psychology, and human-robot interaction. Brad received his PhD in Computer Science from Yale University in 2015, advised by Brian Scassellati. His work has been featured on TedXCambridge, Phys.org, CBC News, Wired, the BBC, Popular Science, MIT Technology Review and the Boston Museum of Science.
 
Event Image Exploring Fake News: How It Happens and How to Spot It with Patrick Ferrucci
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

This session will take a deep look into the world of fake news. We'll examine various theories of media sociology to understand how fake news happens and spreads. We'll take highlight steps people can take to identify what is and what isn't fake news. Essentially, this session will combine vital elements of both media sociology and media literacy to understand one of the biggest plagues in our country currently: fake news.
Exploring Fake News: How It Happens and How to Spot It with Patrick Ferrucci
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

This session will take a deep look into the world of fake news. We'll examine various theories of media sociology to understand how fake news happens and spreads. We'll highlight steps people can take to identify what is and what isn't fake news. Essentially, this session will combine vital elements of both media sociology and media literacy to understand one of the biggest plagues in our country currently: fake news.

Part of the Diversity and Inclusion Summit.
Event Image Gender & Sexuality Caucus
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

The Chancellor’s Standing Committee on Gender and Sexuality welcomes all LGBTQ individuals and supporters of the LGBTQ community to a caucus discussion on inclusiveness and belonging on campus. This caucus will provide an open forum for talking about the challenges that individuals face at CU related to expressing their sexual and gender identity, as well as intersections with other social identities. We will also discuss existing and future efforts to improve the campus climate for LGBTQ individuals. Light refreshments will be provided.
Event Image Post-election dialogues: Moving forward with diversity & inclusion
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Join a facilitated dialogue exploring the diverse range of perspectives, hopes, and fears held by members of the CU community in our post-election climate. Dialogue participants will be invited to share their experiences with issues around diversity and inclusion on campus since the election and how these experiences can shape CU’s ongoing efforts towards inclusive excellence.

Developed by BoulderTalks, CU Dialogues, and the Intergroup Relations Working Group, these dialogues provide a chance to continue to co-construct what inclusion and diversity mean here at CU, especially in our current post-election climate.
 
The dialogues are scheduled for the following times in the Glenn Miller Ballroom in the UMC:
 
- Feb. 23, 11:00 - 12:15
- Feb. 23, 12:30 - 1:45
- Feb. 23, 2:00 - 3:15
- Feb. 23, 3:30 - 4:45

These dialogues are part of CU Boulder’s Diversity and Inclusion Summit.

 
Leah Sprain, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor | University of Colorado Boulder
SLA Reading Group
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

SLA Reading Group

Event Image Buff Talks: Execs Tell All
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

When: Thursday, February 23rd 4-6pm
​Where: ​C4C, Abrams Lounge
​Who: All students welcome

Don't Put This Off:Time Management Basics
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

* Fleming 150* Join us in this workshop to get some basic tips and tricks on how to plan and manage time throughout the semester!
We guarantee that you will walk out with ideas that can work for you!
Cafe Pedagogique: Diversity in the Classroom...and Beyond
5:00 PM - 7:30 PM

"Diversity in the Classroom... and Beyond" is the title of this year's Cafe Pedagogique, a unique un-conference opportunity to make connections and share ideas. In the classic tradition of the intellectual "salon," there will be food and drinks, but with a contemporary and playful twist... and we're not just talking about the Plinko board full of topics! Come join in the fun at Twisted Pine Brewing Co! Advanced registration is required with a cap of 50 people, so sign up now! Your $15 per person entry fee will go toward a scholarship for students registered with CU Boulder's Disability Services. The activities start at 5:30 pm and the doors will open at 5 pm.
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Talk: Professor John Fabian Witt (Yale University)
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Professor John Fabian Witt (Yale University) “The Radical Roots of Brown v. Board: A Blueprint for Modern Constitutional Change” The Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education is at the center of contemporary American constitutional law. And yet for at least a decade critics have charged that Brown adopted a thin, formal, and legalistic conception of civil rights inadequate to the task before it. By going to the roots of the efforts that eventually produced the decision, we can glimpse Brown’s radical beginnings – and make sense of why every constitutional transformation that has followed has sought to replicate its basic blueprint. Author of Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History (2013 Bancroft Prize), John Fabian Witt is Allen H. Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law at Yale Law School and a professor in Yale’s history department, where he teaches the history of American law, the laws of war, and the law of torts. Other writings include Patriots and Cosmopolitans and the prize-winning The Accidental Republic. He recently published a book on the law of torts, Torts: Cases, Principles, and Institutions, and is currently editing a book on constitutional orders in emergencies, as well as writing a history of the Garland Fund: the 1920s philanthropic foundation whose work financed the efforts that culminated in Brown v. Board of Education. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the Society of American Historians, and the recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship. This talk is sponsored by the CU Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa as part of the 2016-17 Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program.
ALTEC Community Courses non-credit languages
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Various language courses
Event Image Catholic Feminism: Is the Church Anti-Woman?
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

The Aquinas Institute for Catholic Thought will host its 10th annual Great Debate at the University of Colorado. Erika Bachiochi of the Ethics and Public Policy Center and Mary Anne Case of the University of Chicago will go head-to-head debating whether the Catholic Church really respects women.

Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. For more information, please contact the Catholic Center at 303-443-8383 or visit the Great Debate event page.
Event Image Master Student Recital: Decker Babcock, jazz trombone
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

"Pure Imagination- Decker Babcock Masters Recital"

Decker Babcock presents "Pure Imagination," a new and exciting performance showcasing the more expressive side of the trombone. Joining Babcock will be a few of the region's finest musicians: Johnathan Saraga, trumpet; Walter Gorra, organ and piano; Mike Facey, bass; and Kyle Gentile, drums. Come out to see this amazing performance of newly arranged music as well as originals for trombone and rhythm section. Decker Babcock performs exclusively on XO trombones.
Artist page: http://www.xobrass.com/portfolio-item/decker-babcock/ 


PROGRAM: Victor Schertzinger/Johnny Mercer: "I Remember You"; Chucho Valdes: "Claudia"; Gordon Jay Vernick: "Freudian Slip"; Leslie Bricusse/Anthony Newley: "Pure Imagination"; Roy Hargrove: "Strasbourg St. Denis"; Decker Babcock: "The Blues"

College of Music   Map to Venue
Event Image Master Student Recital: Katherine Ward, piano
7:30 PM - 8:45 PM

Pianist Katherine Ward, student of Dr. David Korevaar, presents her second master's recital, featuring music by Beethoven, Chopin, Faure and Debussy. 

PROGRAM: Ludwig van Beethoven: Sonata No. 31, Op. 110; Frédéric Chopin: Scherzo No. 3, Op. 39; Gabriel Fauré: Nocturne No. 5, Op. 37; Claude Debussy: "Masques," "D'un cahier d'esquisses" and "L'isle joyeuse"

College of Music   Map to Venue
Event Image Senior Student Recital: Caroline Vickstrom, soprano
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Soprano Caroline Vickstrom presents "A Celebration of Women Composers" for her senior voice recital. Featuring a collection of works spanning from early Hildegard von Bingen to romantic Clara Schumann all the way to contemporary Lori Laitman, this program will be an insight into the beautiful music of female composers throughout the centuries.

PROGRAM: Hildegard von Bingen: Selections from "Ordo Virtutum"; Barbara Strozzi: "Che si può fare?"; Isabella Colbran: "Povero cor tu palpiti"; Clara Schumann: "Liebst du um Schönheit," "Er ist gekommen," and "Ich stand in dunklen Träumen"; Cécile Chaminade: "Écrin"; Nadia Boulanger: "Le Couteau"; Jane Vieu: "La belle au bois dormant"; Amy Beach: "I Send my Heart up to Thee"; Lori Laitman: "If I..."; Libby Larsen: "When I am an Old Woman" 

College of Music   Map to Venue

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